Oak Creek looks like its old self with crystal clear water that is almost back to normal flows. Along with the beautiful weather and pristine creek conditions came gobs of campers and hikers taking advantage of this beautiful canyon. Throughout the day, I landed two fish, one a good size brown and a stocker rainbow. Mid day, I was drifting a heavy nymph through a deep chute when a large brown laid into my stonefly. After about 30 seconds, my 6x tippet snapped leaving me empty handed and more than a little frustrated. In the late afternoon, I moved a little farther north and walked quite a ways, taking the time to fish only the best looking water. Overall a beautiful day on the creek, but probably one of my last for a while. The kicker of the day came as I was fishing my favorite portion of the stream. As I was working a usually productive run, I observed a father, wife, grandmother, and a few kids working their way towards the creek from the opposite side. With literally miles of productive water in both directions, they plop down 30 yards away on the opposite bank and begin casting spinning gear into the same pool that I was fishing. Immediately, the fish I was working darted for the depths and the cover of the rocks as lures are landing just a few feet from me. Common sense should dictate that this type of behavior is completely unacceptable and wrong. I probably should have said something, but due to the fact that I was boiling mad and probably would have said something regrettable, I bit my tongue and walked away. The actions and attitude of anglers like this, perpetuate my thoughts of looking for waters that are a little more remote and devoid of a human foot print. I love Oak Creek and its high canyon walls. It has taught me many things about fly fishing, but the rumble of the passing cars and the kids throwing rocks into the pools that I am fishing can only keep me coming back for so long.

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